Fit Tips

This Is What Sugar Does To Your Brain

October 21st, 2019 by Debbie Martilotta

We know that too much sugar is bad for our waistlines and our heart health, but now there’s mounting evidence that high levels of sugar consumption can also have a negative effect on brain health — from cognitive function to psychological wellbeing.

While sugar is nothing to be too concerned about in small quantities, most of us are simply eating too much of it. The sweet stuff — which also goes by names like glucose, fructose, honey, and corn syrup — is found in 74 percent of packaged foods in our supermarkets. And while the Word Health Organization recommends that only 5 percent of daily caloric intake come from sugar, the typical American diet is comprised of 13 percent calories from sugar.

It’s easy to see how we can get hooked on sugar. However, we should be aware of the risks that a high-sugar diet poses for brain function and mental well-being.

Here’s what you need to know about how overconsumption of sugar could wreak havoc on your brain.

It creates a vicious cycle of intense cravings.

When a person consumes sugar, just like any food, it activates the tongue’s taste receptors. Then, signals are sent to the brain, lighting up reward pathways and causing a surge of feel-good hormones, like dopamine, to be released. Sugar “hijacks the brain’s reward pathway,” neuroscientist Jordan Gaines Lewis explained. And while stimulating the brain’s reward system with a piece of chocolate now and then is pleasurable and probably harmless, when the reward system is activated too much and too frequently, we start to run into problems.

“Over-activating this reward system kickstarts a series of unfortunate events — loss of control, craving, and increased tolerance to sugar,” neuroscientist Nicole Avena explained in a TED-Ed video.

In fact, research has shown that the brains of obese children actually light up differently when they taste sugar, reflecting an elevated “food reward” response. This suggests that their brain circuitry may predispose these children to a lifetime of intense sugar cravings.

It impairs memory and learning skills.

2012 study on rats, conducted by researchers at UCLA, found that a diet high in fructose (that’s just another word for sugar) hinders learning and memory by literally slowing down the brain. The researchers found that rats who over-consumed fructose had damaged synaptic activity in the brain, meaning that communication among brain cells was impaired.

Heavy sugar intake caused the rats to develop a resistance to insulin — a hormone that controls blood sugar levels and also regulates the function of brain cells. Insulin strengthens the synaptic connections between brain cells, helping them to communicate better and thereby form stronger memories. So when insulin levels in the brain are lowered as the result of excess sugar consumption, cognition can be impaired.

“Insulin is important in the body for controlling blood sugar, but it may play a different role in the brain,” Dr. Fernando Gomez-Pinilla, the study’s lead author, said in a statement. “Our study shows that a high-fructose diet harms the brain as well as the body. This is something new.”

It may cause or contribute to depression and anxiety.

If you’ve ever experienced a sugar crash, then you know that sudden peaks and drops in blood sugar levels can cause you to experience symptoms like irritability, mood swings, brain fog, and fatigue. That’s because eating a sugar-laden donut or drinking a soda causes blood sugar levels to spike upon consumption and then plummet. When your blood sugar inevitably dips back down (hence the “crash”), you may find yourself feeling anxious, moody or depressed.

Sugar-rich and carb-laden foods can also mess with the neurotransmitters that help keep our moods stable. Consuming sugar stimulates the release of the mood-boosting neurotransmitter serotonin. Constantly over-activating these serotonin pathways can deplete our limited supplies of the neurotransmitter, which can contribute to symptoms of depression.

Chronically high blood sugar levels have also been linked to inflammation in the brain. And as some research has suggested, neuroinflammation may be one possible cause of depression. Teenagers may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of sugar on mood.

Research has also found that people who eat a standard American diet that’s high in processed foods — which typically contain high amounts of saturated fat, sugar, and salt — are at an increased risk for developing depression, compared to those who eat a whole foods diet that’s lower in sugar.

It’s a risk factor for age-related cognitive decline and dementia.

A growing body of research suggests that a sugar-heavy diet could increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. A 2013 study found that insulin resistance and blood glucose levels — which are hallmarks of diabetes — are linked with a greater risk for developing neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s. The research “offers more evidence that the brain is a target organ for damage by high blood sugar,” endocrinologist Dr. Medha Munshi told the New York Times.


Strength training: Get stronger, leaner, healthier

October 15th, 2019 by Debbie Martilotta

Want to reduce body fat, increase lean muscle mass and burn calories more efficiently? Strength training to the rescue! Strength training is a key component of overall health and fitness for everyone.

Use it or lose it

Lean muscle mass naturally diminishes with age.

You’ll increase the percentage of fat in your body if you don’t do anything to replace the lean muscle you lose over time. Strength training can help you preserve and enhance your muscle mass at any age.

Strength training may also help you:

  • Develop strong bones. By stressing your bones, strength training can increase bone density and reduce the risk of osteoporosis.
  • Manage your weight. Strength training can help you manage or lose weight, and it can increase your metabolism to help you burn more calories.
  • Enhance your quality of life Strength training may enhance your quality of life and improve your ability to do everyday activities. Building muscle also can contribute to better balance and may reduce your risk of falls. This can help you maintain independence as you age.
  • Manage chronic conditions. Strength training can reduce the signs and symptoms of many chronic conditions, such as arthritis, back pain, obesity, heart disease, depression, and diabetes.
  • Sharpen your thinking skills. Some research suggests that regular strength training and aerobic exercise may help improve thinking and learning skills for older adults.

Consider the options

Strength training can be done at home or in the gym. Common choices include:

  • Bodyweight. You can do many exercises with little or no equipment. Try pushups, pullups, planks and leg squats.
  • Resistance tubing. Resistance tubing is an inexpensive, lightweight tubing that provides resistance when stretched. You can choose from many types of resistance tubes in nearly any sporting goods store.
  • Free weights. Barbells and dumbbells are classic strength training tools. If you don’t have weights at home, you can use soup cans.
  • Weight machines. Most fitness centers offer various resistance machines. You can invest in weight machines for use at home, too.

Getting started

If you have a chronic condition, or if you’re older than age 40 and you haven’t been active recently, check with your doctor before beginning a strength training or aerobic fitness program.

Before beginning strength training, consider warming up with brisk walking or another aerobic activity for five or 10 minutes. Cold muscles are more prone to injury than are warm muscles.

Choose a weight or resistance level heavy enough to tire your muscles after about 12 to 15 repetitions. When you can easily do more repetitions of a certain exercise, gradually increase the weight or resistance.

Research shows that a single set of 12 to 15 repetitions with the proper weight can build muscle efficiently in most people and can be as effective as three sets of the same exercise.

To give your muscles time to recover, rest one full day between exercising each specific muscle group.

Also, be careful to listen to your body. If a strength training exercise causes pain, stop the exercise. Consider trying a lower weight or trying it again in a few days.

It’s important to use proper technique in strength training to avoid injuries. If you’re new to weight training, work with a trainer or other fitness specialist to learn the correct form and technique. Remember to breathe as you strength train.

When to expect results

You don’t need to spend hours a day lifting weights to benefit from strength training. You can see significant improvement in your strength with just two or three 20- or 30-minute weight training sessions a week.

The Department of Health and Human Services recommends incorporating strength training exercises for all major muscle groups into a fitness routine at least two times a week.

As you incorporate strength training exercises into your fitness routine, you may notice an improvement in your strength over time. As your muscle mass increases, you’ll likely be able to lift weight more easily and for longer periods of time. If you keep it up, you can continue to increase your strength, even if you’re not in shape when you begin.

By Mayo Clinic Staff


Don’t Let Pain Sideline Your Workout

September 24th, 2019 by Debbie Martilotta

Life comes with pain, but that does not mean you have to miss out on the moments that make up your life story. Thanks to Green Roads Muscle and Joint Relief Cream, you don’t have to worry about the minor aches and pains of life holding you back.

If you know me, you know that I am very picky about what I eat and put on my body. I choose organic all the time. I want to use the best and “cleanest” ingredients and stress this to my clients also. When a couple of clients asked me about CBD for pain and muscle soreness, I did my research. A trainer is only as good as their advice and guidance, and their clients’ well-being must come 1st! I chose to carry the Green Roads Wellness product and am happy to offer their CBD Pain Cream in my gym.

Green Roads CBD pain cream is infused with menthol, lavender oil, vitamin E, pure CBD & more. It is the best CBD topical cream for pain relief & inflammation and offers a great solution for aches and pains. Simply rub into stiff, painful joints and muscles for fast, effective relief.

As always, every Green Roads product is infused with hemp-derived CBD, extracted from the hemp plant via supercritical CO2 extraction, then winterized to purify the concentrated CBD and purge all unwanted plant products/cannabinoids from the final product. In addition, their Relief Cream is infused with menthol, chamomile extract, and lavender oil to bring you the relief you need and the pleasant aroma you desire, without leaving a greasy residue behind.

Wow, we have been waiting for this CBD Pain Cream. In the past, there have been pain creams for muscle and joint pain, but they were far too weak to be effective. We couldn’t understand why manufacturers were making these creams too low of a CBD concentration. This cream does the job with the right concentration of CBD with the familiar menthol smell you are already know – highly recommended!

Green Roads’ mission is to offer users a safe, effective alternative to prescription painkillers, other toxic prescription drugs and over-the-counter drugs that contain harsh chemical compounds alien to nature’s perfect remedies. Their vision is to bring our customers natural products and understand that, “There’s Always An Alternative!”

Debbie Martilotta, Owner and CPT
DBM Strength Training


Weightlifting Is Better For Your Heart

July 15th, 2019 by Debbie Martilotta

Strength training is better than cardio for reducing dangerous fat in the heart to protect against cardiovascular disease, according to a recent study conducted at Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark.

The researchers wrote in the journal JAMA Cardiology: Overall, our results suggest that resistance training may be superior to endurance training as resistance training reduced pericardial adipose tissue and improved fitness and strength, while endurance training only improved fitness.

The team found that a type of heart fat called pericardial adipose tissue was reduced among participants who did weighted exercises such as lunges with dumbbells or weighted push-ups, but not among those who did endurance training with aerobic exercise.

In individuals with abdominal obesity, both endurance and resistance training reduced epicardial adipose tissue mass, while only resistance training reduced pericardial adipose tissue mass.

Both types of exercise did reduce levels of another type of heart fat called epicardial adipose tissue, which has also been associated with cardiovascular disease.


7 Tips For Staying Fit On Vacation

June 19th, 2019 by Debbie Martilotta

1. Prepare Ahead of Time
As cliche as it may sound, failing to prepare, is preparing to fail. If you are traveling to your vacation destination by car, pack yourself a portable cooler with some of your favorite nutritious snacks like:

• Fresh fruit
• Raw vegetables
• Yogurt
• Hard-boiled eggs
• Ready-to-drink protein shakes

Remember to pack a small ice pack and a few bottles of waters in your cooler. Or if you don’t have an ice pack, just freeze the water bottles and drink them as they thaw.
Packing several of your favorite dry-food items is also a great idea. Whether you’re taking a car or plane, it’s much easier than many people think to stack your bag with healthy treats. Try any of the following:

• Protein bars
• Jerky
• Nuts
• Dried fruit
• Protein powder in a shaker cup

If you are traveling to your vacation destination by car, pack yourself a portable cooler with some of your favorite nutritious snacks.

2. Become an Educated Consumer
When you head to a new restaurant, it’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of eating out, which can lead to impulsive eating and overindulgence. To combat this, do your homework ahead of time. If you’re staying at a resort, hotel, or condo of some sort, check out the surrounding restaurants you may want to try in advance.

Peruse the menu ahead of time to identify meals that are appealing but fit within the parameters of your diet. You may even want to call ahead and ask if the restaurant can prepare off-menu meals for you, especially if you’re getting ready for any sort of competition.

3. Grocery Shop
Once you arrive at your destination, locate a nearby supermarket or grocery store. If you are staying at a condo or hotel for several days, don’t rely on restaurants for every meal. It’s costly, and there some things you can’t always control. Instead, swing by the closest supermarket or grocery store.

Shop for your favorite quick-and-easy dry foods mentioned above so you always have a snack on hand. If your condo or hotel has a refrigerator or mini fridge, purchase some of your favorite nutritious foods that pack well and are easy to grab on the go. Instant oatmeal is a great way to start your morning if you have access to a microwave, and simple sandwiches make excellent on-the-go meals.

4. Make Smart Swaps
Simply omitting a creamy sauce or substituting a rich sauce with marinara can significantly reduce calories in a meal. Ordering a dish with a different cooking method than what’s advertised on the menu—grilled instead of sautéed in butter or oil, for example—can also cut calories tremendously.

If weight loss or maintenance is your goal, opt for grilled and baked dishes in lieu of their fried counterparts, which are typically higher in fat and calories. Communicate your nutritional needs with your waiter or waitress when dining out. Request minor modifications to your meal as you see fit, and certainly don’t feel badly about it. After all, you’re the guest!

Asking for salad dressing on the side or substituting steamed vegetables for the usual sides like mashed potatoes are more great ways to reduce the caloric composition of your meal. Most restaurants have nutrition facts posted on their website, which is also a great resource for looking for the caloric content of your meal.

If you’re visiting family and anticipating robust, home-cooked meals prepared by your family members, just keep the overarching principle of moderation in mind. You are on vacation. Do not deprive yourself of enjoyable foods, but practice sensibility and control toward your nutrition.

5. Don’t Skip Meals
Whether you’re busy rushing to tourist sites all day or kicking back on the beach for a full afternoon, it’s easy to lose track of time and skip a meal on vacation. This might seem harmless, but skipping a meal can easily lead to consuming too many calories at your next meal. Keeping your hunger in check is key, so pack a few of your favorite snacks whenever you head out.

If you really want to keep things on point and avoid binges or cravings, a good recommendation is to eat every 3-4 hours. If your goal is to add lean body mass, making sure you are eating enough protein rich snacks and meals, even while on the go, to support your calorie goals.

6. Stay Hydrated
Traveling can dehydrate you. Staying out in the sun longer than your body is used to can also dehydrate you. When you don’t take in enough fluids, it’s easy to mistake dehydration for hunger. Even the slightest bit of dehydration can cause you to believe you need food when, in reality, you just need some sweet H2O.

Recommendations for fluid intake vary from person to person, but an easy way to check your hydration is to, well, check the color of your urination. A well-hydrated individual should have clear or pale yellow urine. Dark yellow or amber urine is typically a sign of dehydration.

Remember, you are likely already dehydrated at the initial sign of thirst. If drinking a gallon of plain water just isn’t your thing, try adding zero-calorie liquid water enhancers to your water. After all, no one said reaching your fluid-intake goals had to be boring! I always bring an empty shaker bottle with me whenever I know I’ll be spending time at the airport. There are water fountains located in every terminal, and this will save you from spending $5 for a bottle of water.

7. Keep Energy Balance in Mind
Dedication to training and nutrition is a great attribute, for sure. But the truth is some time off from training can be beneficial for recovery purposes. However, if you’re not going to train while traveling, you still need to keep the energy balance equation of “calories in versus calories out” in the back of your mind to keep yourself from overeating.

Energy expenditure also plays a key role in maintaining your weight while on vacation. Make an effort to incorporate physical activity into your daily routine while on vacation like walking, playing volleyball in the pool with other vacationers, or getting outdoors and doing more sightseeing.

Want more? Read this: 9 Fun & Fast Ways We Stay Fit While Traveling

by Lou Martilotta


Skipping Breakfast Tied To Heart Disease

April 25th, 2019 by Debbie Martilotta

Whether you eat breakfast might be linked with your risk of dying early from cardiovascular disease, according to a new study.

Skipping breakfast was significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular-related death, especially stroke-related death, in the study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology this April.

Best bet: eggs and veggies microwaved in a cup.

After a person’s age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, diet, lifestyle, body mass index and disease status were taken into account, the study found that those who never had breakfast had an 87% higher risk of cardiovascular mortality compared with people who had breakfast every day.

Breakfast is traditionally believed as the most or at least one of the most important meals of the day, and this paper is among the ones that provide evidence to support long-term benefits. “There are a few cardiovascular risk factors — for example diabetes, hypertension and lipid disorders,” Dr. Wei Bao said. “Our findings are in line with and supported by previous studies that consistently showed that skipping breakfast is related to those strong risk factors for cardiovascular death.”

Skipping breakfast and cardiovascular death
The study involved data from 1988 to 1994 on 6,550 US adults, aged 40 to 75, who reported how often they ate breakfast. The survey data generally let respondents define what meal would be considered breakfast.

Separate data was analyzed to determine the adults’ health status through 2011. All told, 2,318 deaths occurred during an average follow-up period of 18.8 years, including 619 from cardiovascular disease.

The researchers took a close look at how often each person consumed breakfast and at mortality, specifically whether a death was related to cardiovascular health.  Of those adults, 5.1% reported never consuming breakfast; 10.9% rarely ate breakfast; 25% had breakfast on some days; 59% had breakfast every day.

Compared with those who consumed breakfast every day, adults who never did so had a higher risk of heart disease-related death and stroke-related death, according to the study. Those associations were found to be significant and independent of socioeconomic status, body mass index and cardiovascular risk factors, the researchers noted.

“To the best of our knowledge, this is the first prospective analysis of skipping breakfast and risk of cardiovascular mortality,” they wrote.

The complexities of skipping breakfast
In general, the study noted that skipping breakfast has been associated with increased risk of obesity, elevated cholesterol or fats in the blood, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and heart disease.

The new study “was fairly well done,” said Krista Varady, associate professor of nutrition at the University of Illinois, Chicago, who was not involved in the research.
“However, the major issue is that the subjects who regularly skipped breakfast also had the most unhealthy lifestyle habits,” she said. “Specifically, these people were former smokers, heavy drinkers, physically inactive, and also had poor diet quality and low family income.”

All of those factors put people at a much higher risk for cardiovascular disease. “I realize that the study attempted to control for these confounders, but I think it’s hard to tease apart breakfast skipping from their unhealthy lifestyle in general,” Varady said.

Some people might skip breakfast as part of an intermittent fasting routine, but the breakfast skipping in the study and breakfast skipping during intermittent fasting are two different concepts and practices, said Valter Longo, a professor of biological sciences at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles and director of the USC Longevity Institute, who was not involved in the new research. To connect the study’s findings to intermittent fasting, Longo warns “be careful.”

“There are very good ways to do intermittent fasting and potentially very bad ways to do intermittent fasting,” Longo said. “But certainly, that’s an interesting thing to keep in mind, that A: Maybe it’s better to stick with 12 hours or 13 hours of fasting and that’s it,” he said. “Or B: If you need to do 16 hours, try to consider skipping dinner and not breakfast or lunch.”

Read the complete CNN article here


Youth Strength Training: A Parent’s Guide

April 17th, 2019 by Debbie Martilotta

FOR YEARS NOW, ADULTS have been told by medical and fitness experts that strength training is a crucial part of a stable exercise regimen for overall health. We know that cardiovascular fitness is fantastic, but alone, it isn’t enough to keep our bones healthy and our muscles from degenerating as we age. But when it comes to kids’ fitness, historically the exercise focus has been cardiovascular in nature. Yet research has revealed that even children 12 and under can reap the health and physical fitness rewards of strength training. To be most effective, it must be done properly and safely

First, it’s important to note that strength training isn’t the same thing as weightlifting. While weightlifting can be a feature of a strength-training workout, it isn’t the only way to strength train, nor is it appropriate in every form for children and adolescents.

Heavy weightlifting, often called “powerlifting” or “bodybuilding,” aren’t what we’re going for here. These activities aren’t harmful on the surface; they merely increase injury risk – especially for children. You see, depending on a child’s age, not all of their cartilage has yet turned to the bone – especially in the areas of the body where growth plates are located. So placing too large an emphasis on heavy weightlifting can overly tax young muscles, bones, and cartilage. That risk isn’t what we orthopedic specialists would consider being worth the potential reward. But don’t worry, there’s plenty else that is.

Wondering whether you should even bother trying out strength-training exercises on a kid who isn’t particularly “athletic?” The most straightforward answer is yes. Strength training isn’t just for athletes. After all, we humans are all made of the same material. The benefits of this type of exercise are for everybody. From increasing muscle and bone strength, agility and endurance to helping to protect your kiddo’s joints into adulthood, there are plenty of excellent benefits that go beyond a sports field. Physiological benefits aside, the boost in self-confidence and self-esteem that have been demonstrated to accompany this type of consistent exercise are also worthy of consideration.

In children, strength training is best accomplished and less risky when the resistance is light and the movements are incredibly controlled and have been demonstrated by an adult for proper technique and safety. As an added precaution, it’s best for children to be instructed in strength-training methods by an adult who is trained and experienced in the instruction of such techniques for children. Your favorite personal trainer may provide you with a stellar workout, but he or she may not be the most qualified to instruct and supervise your child.

Before beginning any strength-training activity, a proper warm-up of 5 to 10 minutes of easy aerobic exercise is crucial to prepare the muscles. Once the warm-up is complete, one of the best and safest ways to start out with a kid-focused strength-training regimen (this goes for adults, too) is to focus on simple exercises that utilize the child’s own body weight as the “resistance.” A 10- to 15-repetition circuit of exercises like pushups, sit-ups and squats won’t be too complicated for most children, but they must remember the proper technique in performing each activity. If the adult instructor begins to notice form being sacrificed, he or she will likely adjust the number of reps for the child, which is essential to help avoid injury.

Of course, if you have any concerns, it’s always best to clear a strength-training program with your child’s pediatrician before getting started. Other than that, and like anything else with kids, the key to making strength-training stick is consistency and fun. Getting them involved in planning the workout circuit, or better yet, jumping in and doing it with them can be great ways to show your children that you too place a high value on health, fitness and overall wellness – whether you’re 9, 19 or 49.

by Bert Mandelbaum, M.D.


Strength Training Builds More Than Muscles

April 17th, 2019 by Debbie Martilotta

Most of us know that strength training (with free weights, weight machines, or resistance bands) can help build and maintain muscle mass and strength. What many of us don’t know is that strong muscles lead to strong bones. And strong bones can help minimize the risk of fracture due to osteoporosis.

A combination of age-related changes, inactivity, and inadequate nutrition conspire to gradually steal bone mass, at the rate of 1% per year after age 40. As bones grow more fragile and susceptible to fracture, they are more likely to break after even a minor fall or a far less obvious stress, such as bending over to tie a shoelace.

Strength Training builds bones and confidence

Osteoporosis should be a concern for all of us. An estimated eight million women and two million men in the United States have osteoporosis. It is now responsible for more than two million fractures each year, and experts expect that number will rise. Hip fractures are usually the most serious. Six out of 10 people who break a hip never fully regain their former level of independence. Even walking across a room without help may become impossible.

Numerous studies have shown that strength training can play a role in slowing bone loss, and several show it can even build bone. This is tremendously useful to help offset age-related declines in bone mass. Activities that put stress on bones can nudge bone-forming cells into action. That stress comes from the tugging and pushing on bone that occur during strength training (as well as weight-bearing aerobic exercises like walking or running). The result is stronger, denser bones.

And strength training, in particular, has bone benefits beyond those offered by aerobic weight-bearing exercise. It targets bones of the hips, spine, and wrists, which are the sites most likely to fracture. What’s more, resistance workouts — particularly those that include moves emphasizing power and balance — enhance strength and stability. That can boost confidence, encourage you to stay active, and reduce fractures another way — by cutting down on falls.

by Harvard Medical School


5 Important Facts About Sarcopenia

March 11th, 2019 by Debbie Martilotta

Sarcopenia is a relatively new term for the most insidious health crisis in the world. Sarcopenia is a disease that impacts all of us as we age. And there is only one known way to prevent it and treat it.

Here are the 5 most important things you need to know about Sarcopenia:

  1. Sarcopenia is the loss of skeletal muscle mass due to aging
    The functions of skeletal muscle include control of movement and posture; regulation of metabolism; storage of energy; acting as a primary source of amino acids for the brain and immune system; and acting as a substrate for malnutrition/starvation, injury/wound healing, and disease. Maintaining skeletal mass is critical not only for remaining physically independent but also for survival.
  2. Sarcopenia affects half of all older adults
    More than 18 million Americans suffer from sarcopenia. One in three adults over 60 have the disease, and that number increases to over 50 percent by the time they reach age 80.
  3. Muscle loss from Sarcopenia begins in our 30s
    Beginning in our 30s, every single human being on earth develops sarcopenia. Every year we get weaker and weaker unless we proactively work against the muscle loss. The erosion of strength accelerates in our 50s and continue to increase as we move into our 60s. By our mid-70s, there is an exponential increase in the loss of lean tissue.
  4. Sarcopenia can cause muscle weakness, frailty, and loss of independence
    The loss of strength that accompanies sarcopenia will dramatically impact your physical health. This loss of strength makes it hard to recover is we lose our balance. As we become weaker, we become more cautious and less physically active. When we are less active, we are weaker. The downward spiral continues.
  5. Strength training is the only treatment for Sarcopenia
    You can counteract this loss of muscle tissue with strength training, which will also have a positive effect on many other chronic diseases. We’re living longer. Strength is critically important to enjoying the extra four or five decades that we each have been given through medical science advances over the last century.

Strength training, as you age, is the recognized treatment for combating the devastating effects of sarcopenia.

Of all of these important facts, the last one is the most important. Medical scientists at Harvard Medical School, Tufts University, the Academy of Royal Colleges, and dozens more respected medical research institutions have all concluded that intense strength training is the only way to combat the downward spiral of physical health and loss of strength that Sarcopenia causes.

by StrongPath


Rev Up Your Metabolism

February 19th, 2019 by Debbie Martilotta

A recent article by Health.com (Jan/Feb 2019) has some great advice that I agree with as a personal trainer, here are the highlights.

Your muscles are in charge

A pound of muscle burns 7-10 calories/day compared to 1 lb of fat which burns only 2-3 calories/day. We all know that after you hit your 20’s, you lose muscle as you age. That muscle loss can slow your metabolism by 15% (your calorie burning power). While building new muscle can help counteract this trend, it is even more important to engage the muscle you already have. Every time you challenge your muscles by strength training, you burn calories by working out and continue to burn calories after you put your weights away.

Do 2 30-minute sessions of resistance training each week and in 3 months, your resting metabolism will be about 6% faster. When you exercise, focus on major muscle groups and do not shy away from heavy weights (60 – 75% of your maximum lift).

A lack of Protein can slow your metabolism

If you are not already on the protein bandwagon, get on board! Your body needs amino acids to stay functional. Without enough protein, your body will be forced to tap your muscles. When you lose valuable muscle, your resting metabolism slows.

Make sure you are putting protein in every meal and snack – starting your day with 15 grams (about 2 eggs) is a great idea. Don’t overlook whey, one of two proteins found in milk. Whey protein is rich in the amino acids muscles thirst for and can aid in recovery after workouts.

Dieting is the enemy

Any weight loss diet can leave your metabolism slower than when you started. We highly recommend a lifestyle diet of plants and proteins (no grains, sugar, highly processed foods or processed starches) and eat enough calories to satisfy your resting metabolism. The easiest way to do that is to multiply your body weight in lbs by 10.

Your metabolism likes sleep

Lack of sleep tends to slow your metabolism, in part because that’s when your body repairs itself (which burns calories). Sleep well, eat well and exercise hard for 2 30-minute sessions each week and your metabolism will thank you.