Fit Tips

Happy New Year

December 26th, 2018 by Debbie Martilotta

For most, the New Year is for resolution and new goals. Sometimes, for repeating goals that were set last New Years Eve.

But for me, it is another holiday, wonderful on its own, but another day of living the lifestyle I chose several years ago. I eat a strict diet of food my body needs to function at its best daily. I exercise twice a week for 30-minutes and focus on balance in my work and personal life, as best I can.

I gave myself this gift.

I too had my New Years resolutions over the years. I found that until I made my lifestyle fit my goals, I was destined to keep chasing those resolutions. So, as Christmas has just ended, you might wonder what my “lifestyle” looked like?

I worked out twice a week for 30-minutes each.
I kept to my diet of lean meat and fish and plants.
I avoided changing my lifestyle to “go with the flow”.
I drank water, not wine.
I ate from the veggie tray, not the dessert tray.
I declined invitations that overscheduled me.

My clients have varying goals. Some really want to be focused on building a strong, lean, body, and many want to be stronger and leaner. For all my clients, I am privileged to be their personal trainer. I will support their diet and fitness goals and champion their successes. But for all of my current and future clients, know that I also wish for you to find your own “lifestyle” that you can live each and every day, regardless of the holiday or the company you are in.

Stay true to your goals, hold tight to the vision you have for the best version of you, and let me support your daily resolutions in 2019!

Debbie Martilotta
Owner and Certified Personal Trainer 

 


An Inspiring Story of Fitness and Hard Work

December 11th, 2018 by Debbie Martilotta

Despite the constantly rising interest in health and wellness, we are plagued by an obesity epidemic; 67% of gym members never actually visit their gym, and 80% of us will fail our New Year’s resolutions by February.

We have more information available, more health products on the market, and more gyms than ever before,
so why aren’t we healthier and fitter than ever before?

As someone who has been involved with the fitness industry for five decades, I’ve spent a lot of time trying to answer that question, and I’ve only come up with one answer. The current health and wellness industry is failing us.

Hard work and sound science have been replaced by fads, false promises, and magic pills.
When you’re promised something like “rock hard abs in 28 days,” told one special tea is all you need to lose those last 10 pounds or bombarded with flashy advertisements passed off as legitimate information, it’s easy to see why so many people just throw up their hands and give up.

A healthier, fitter America starts with you. There is no gimmick. There is no shortcut. There is no magic pill. Everyone’s fitness journey will be unique, but a healthy lifestyle takes commitment, patience, and motivation.

I can already hear you saying, “Easy for you to say, Arnold. Fitness has always been your life and you’ve always been in top shape.”

But I had to work my way back from the bottom this year, and I learned a lot along the way. After I underwent open-heart surgery this spring, I had to use a walker. I had to do breathing exercises five times a day to retrain my lungs. I was frustrated and angry, and in my worst moments, I couldn’t see the way back to my old self.

Three months later, I returned to a film set to star in a new Terminator movie, and you probably know that there is no such thing as a weak Terminator. I’d love to tell you it was because of a certain product or workout or diet, but it wasn’t.

I just kept walking. I kept breathing. I kept trying. I was lucky; I had a huge team around me supporting me the whole way. Eventually, I got into the gym and went through the motions without weights at first. I upgraded from walks around my backyard to bike rides. I didn’t worry about six-packs or bench pressing 500 pounds. My only goal was improving a little bit every single day, and eventually, all of those small improvements and all of that support brought me back to a strong, healthy place.

Going through that process showed me that many people put too much faith in big moments, believing they’ll suddenly flip a switch and be healthier. There’s no such thing. A healthier future is every tiny step we take, or every little rep, that ultimately leads us to our goal. We all think we can do it alone, but no one does anything alone. As I always say, no one is self-made. We all need support — even Terminators.

So here’s my challenge to you:

Don’t wait for New Year’s Resolutions. Don’t wait for your own heart surgery or emergency. Start right now.

I’m not asking you to reject all the delicious food you’ll see this holiday season because I would never do that either. I’m simply asking you to be better tomorrow than you were today, every day, and to inspire someone you care about to join you. It’s a simple resolution and it’s not as sexy as having a six-pack, but it’s the key to fulfilling the unfulfilled promise of our fitness crusade and repairing this broken industry.

Don’t chase the next big thing. Be better. Today. That’s all. If you and your training partner walked 5,000 steps yesterday, walk 5,001 today. If you ate one vegetable yesterday, eat two tomorrow. If you did a pushup for the first time today, do two tomorrow.

If you can join me in celebrating the small wins and supporting each other, we’ll create a healthier America, and our fitness crusade will be a success. And in January, when everybody else is scrambling, we’ll already be well on our way.

Let’s do this. Be better together. Today.

by Arnold Schwarzenegger


Protein And Aging: Everything You Need To Know

December 11th, 2018 by Debbie Martilotta

Your diet tends to evolve along with the number of candles on your birthday cake. For example, in your hard-training teens and early 20s, you could probably eat at Taco Bell several times a week and still remain fairly lean. That changes during your 30s and 40s. After turning 50, many people start dropping their calories in response to an ever-slower metabolism.

While reducing calories may help you maintain your body weight, is lowering your energy intake the best option for overall health?

Not necessarily, especially if your calorie cutting involves consuming less protein. Protein supports muscle health and growth, which helps your body stay functional at all ages. It’s also what helps support proper tissue health, including hair, teeth, and fingernails. Protein subunits called amino acids are integral components of signaling molecules and represent half of all hormones.

Research suggests that increasing protein intake as you age can support weight management and body-fat reduction. This is due to the enhanced metabolic rate and better satiety that occurs with consuming enough protein.

Father Time Does Not Like Muscle, Unfortunately
In your 30s, your muscle mass begins to naturally decline; after 50, this decline only accelerates. However, adequate consumption of protein, paired with resistance training, dramatically decelerates age-related loss in muscle mass and increases strength in individuals of all ages.

How do you know if you’re getting enough protein? 

At DBM Strength Training, we recommend .8 grams per lb of body weight. (a 130lb female would consume 104 grams of protein daily, a 180 lb male would aim for 144 grams daily).

What Are The Recommendations For Older Active Adults?
Keep in mind, these recommendations do not reflect changing macronutrient needs associated with age, nor do they consider the additional protein needs for those individuals who exercise regularly. General sports nutrition recommendations for athletes are approximately 1-2 grams per kilogram of body weight per day or 82-164 grams of protein per day for a 180-pound adult. Knowing all this, it seems safe to say that older adults could benefit from higher protein intake, especially if they are physically active, including regular exercise.

Do Aging Women Have Different Protein Needs From Aging Men?
The overall need for more protein in later years is even more pronounced in women. Research including more than 300 elderly participants (average age of 72) indicates that women who consume between 0.8-1.2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day tend to have fewer health problems than those consuming less than 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight per day.

Protein intake is a modifiable risk factor for sarcopenia—loss of muscle mass—in aging individuals. Protein also contributes to enhanced bone density, greater strength, and improved overall health. Since osteoporosis a bigger concern for aging women versus men, enhanced bone density and strength would be additionally beneficial on top of maintaining muscle mass and overall health.

Are There Risks Associated With A High-Protein Diet, Particularly For Older Adults?
The primary objection to increased protein in the diet is the concern that the elevated amino acid intake will stress or damage the kidneys. It’s true that individuals with impaired kidney health should avoid excess protein consumption. However, research conducted on healthy individuals with normal kidney function of varying age, sex, and training status does not seem to support the fear that high protein intake will lead to kidney damage. In addition, investigations aimed at evaluating fitness, performance, and muscle function in over-50 populations consistently supports an increased intake of protein.

What Exactly Does This Mean For You?
It’s difficult to pinpoint exactly how much protein any specific individual needs in a day based solely on ranges, which is why aiming for a precise goal (number of grams) of protein each day can be a more productive way to support your body composition goals, especially after age 50.

Are Protein Shakes Safe For Older Adults?

Yes. In fact, protein supplementation can provide tremendous benefit to aging individuals who struggle to meet target protein intake levels with whole foods alone. As we age, reduced appetites can also make it difficult to meet protein goals through diet alone—another reason why it may be necessary to supplement using protein powders and protein shakes.

Which Protein Powder Is Best For Older Adults?

A range of protein supplements can help individuals meet their specific protein needs. Finding a protein supplement that fits your lifestyle and diet can take some effort. But if the alternative to protein supplementation is consistently failing to meet daily protein targets, adding a supplement is highly advised.

When searching for supplements, seek reputable brands with ingredient lists that are short and understandable. You should be able to recognize and understand what a protein powder is made of. We are happy to make suggestions and assist you with planning a daily diet through the gym.

Read the complete article at Bodybuilding.com


Is Self-Care Selfish?

November 28th, 2018 by Debbie Martilotta

Self-care is not an indulgence. Self-care is a discipline. It requires tough-mindedness, a deep and personal understanding of your priorities, and a respect for both yourself and the people you choose to spend your life with.

For example, self-care is:

  • Turning off the TV instead of watching another episode of “The Crown” because the alarm is going off at 5 am so you can get to the gym.
  • Declining the second drink at the office holiday party. It might even be declining the first drink.
  • Choosing organic food and cooking for the health of your body.
  • Saying “no” to the thing you don’t want to do even if someone is going to be angry at you.
  • Maintaining financial independence.
  • Doing work that matters.
  • Moving your body and maintaining your physical strength and health.
  • Letting other people take care of themselves.

If we are being honest, self-care is actually kind of boring. This is why self-care is a discipline. It takes discipline to do the things that are good for us instead of what feels good in the moment. It takes even more discipline to refuse to take responsibility for other people’s emotional well-being. And it takes discipline to take full and complete responsibility for our own well-being.

Self-care is also a discipline because it’s not something you do once in a while when the world gets crazy. It’s what you do every day, every week, month in and month out. It’s taking care of yourself in a way that doesn’t require you to “indulge” in order to restore balance.

It’s making the commitment to stay healthy and balanced as a regular practice.


Better Aging With Resistance Strength Training

November 19th, 2018 by Debbie Martilotta

Sarcopenia refers to the loss of muscle as we age. The average adult experiences a 5 lb muscle loss, a 5% reduction in metabolic function, and a 15 lb fat gain 10 years.  This leads to chronic inflammation, insulin resistance, compromised health and vitality, among other things.  It is no wonder we feel less than our best the older we get.

The good news is that there is a way to stop and even reverse sarcopenia: Resistance Strength Training.

Studies have shown that even brief bouts of strength training(performed at the right intensity) lead to a whole host of adaptations within the body.  The improvement in muscle quality due to proper strength training leads to improvements in brain function, bone density, hormonal levels, metabolic function, and even gastrointestinal function!

As time passes, our bodies are either on a steady decline or are improving.

The key to keeping your body functioning at its best is to find a strength training program that is safe, effective, and measurable.  Today’s technology allows us to use Smart measures to strength train with the perfect intensity to produce the positive adaptations we all need.  Seek to find an atmosphere where you will have expert guidance and accountability to keep you on track, like DBM Strength Training.

If you are feeling the effects of age, let us help you change your life, 30-minutes at a time!


DOMS: Reducing Inflammation Through Diet and Recover Quicker

November 5th, 2018 by Debbie Martilotta

You know that moment. You wake up a few days after a workout and think to yourself, “Ah, now I feel it.” The technical term for this post-workout evidence of hard effort is delayed onset muscle soreness or DOMS.

 

DOMS happens when you work your muscles harder
than they are used to working. 

That’s the simple explanation, but on a biological level, there’s a lot more going on. When we work our bodies harder than they are used to, the response is inflammation. The next natural step is an immune response. When our bodies can’t deal with exercise-induced muscle damage, we experience DOMS. While the exact mechanisms are not well understood, DOMS appears to be a product of inflammation caused by microscopic tears in the connective tissue elements that sensitize nociceptors and thereby heighten the sensations of pain.

Smart recovery can prevent DOMS from derailing your training.

  • The best recovery foods to eat after an intense workout are raw, organic whole foods containing healthy amounts of carbs and protein
  • Some of the specific foods shown to soothe muscle soreness include bananas, cacao, coffee, eggs, salmon, spinach, sweet potatoes, and watermelon, as well as spices like cinnamon, ginger, and turmeric
  • Two substances you should avoid combining with exercise are alcohol and sugar, both of which cause inflammation

Cut Your Cancer Risk By Eating Organic

October 23rd, 2018 by Debbie Martilotta

You can protect yourself from cancer by eating organic, a new study suggests.

Those who frequently eat organic foods lowered their overall risk of developing cancer, a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine finds. Specifically, those who primarily eat organic foods were more likely to ward off non-Hodgkin lymphoma and postmenopausal breast cancer compared to those who rarely or never ate organic foods.

Led by Julia Baudry, an epidemiologist at Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale in France, a team of researchers looked at the diets of 68,946 French adults. More than three-quarters of the volunteers were women, in their mid-40s on average. These volunteers were categorized into four groups depending on how often they reported eating 16 organic products, including fruits and vegetables, meat and fish, ready-to-eat meals, vegetable oils and condiments, dietary supplements and other products.

Follow-up time varied for each participant but lasted slightly more than four and a half years on average, and during that time, the study volunteers developed a total of 1,340 cancers. The most prevalent was breast cancer (459) followed by prostate cancer (180), skin cancer (135), colorectal cancer (99), and non-Hodgkin lymphomas (47).
The authors calculated cancer risk

Comparing the participants’ organic food scores with cancer cases,
the researchers calculated a negative relationship between high scores
(eating the most organic food) and overall cancer risk.

Those who ate the most organic food were 25% less likely to develop cancer. Specifically, they were 73% less likely to develop non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 21% less likely to develop post-menopausal breast cancer.

Even participants who ate low-to-medium quality diets yet stuck with organic food experienced a reduced risk of cancer, the authors found.
The authors theorize a “possible explanation” for the negative relationship between organic food and cancer risk stems from the “significant” reduction of contamination that occurs when conventional foods are replaced by organic foods.

“If the findings are confirmed, promoting organic food consumption in the general population could be a promising preventive strategy against cancer,” Baudry and her colleagues concluded. Read the complete article link the link below.

by Susan Scutti, CNN


How to Fight Muscle Loss Due to Aging

September 18th, 2018 by Debbie Martilotta

Sarcopenia, also known as muscle loss, is a common condition that affects 10% of adults who are over 50 years old.

While it can decrease life expectancy and quality of life, there are actions you can take to prevent and even reverse the condition.

Although some of the causes of sarcopenia are a natural consequence of aging, others are preventable. In fact, a healthy diet and regular exercise can reverse sarcopenia, increasing lifespan and quality of life.

What Is Sarcopenia?
Sarcopenia literally means “lack of flesh.” It’s a condition of age-associated muscle degeneration that becomes more common in people over the age of 50. After middle age, adults lose 3% of their muscle strength every year, on average. This limits their ability to perform many routine activities. Unfortunately, sarcopenia also shortens life expectancy in those it affects, compared to individuals with normal muscle strength.

Sarcopenia is caused by an imbalance between signals for muscle cell growth and signals for teardown. Cell growth processes are called “anabolism,” and cell teardown processes are called “catabolism”. For example, growth hormones act with protein-destroying enzymes to keep muscle steady through a cycle of growth, stress or injury, destruction and then healing. This cycle is always occurring, and when things are in balance, muscle keeps its strength over time.

However, during aging, the body becomes resistant to the normal growth signals, tipping the balance toward catabolism and muscle loss. Although aging is the most common cause of sarcopenia, other factors can also trigger an imbalance between muscle anabolism and catabolism.

Four Factors That Accelerate Muscle Loss

  • Immobility, Including a Sedentary Lifestyle
  • Unbalanced Diet
  • Inflammation
  • Severe Stress

Exercise Can Reverse Sarcopenia
The strongest way to fight sarcopenia is to keep your muscles active. Combinations of aerobic exercise, resistance training, and balance training can prevent and even reverse muscle loss. At least two to four exercise sessions weekly may be required to achieve these benefits.

All types of exercise are beneficial, but some more than others.

1. Resistance Training
Resistance training includes weightlifting, pulling against resistance bands or moving part of the body against gravity. When you perform resistance exercise, the tension on your muscle fibers results in growth signals that lead to increased strength. Resistance exercise also increases the actions of growth-promoting hormones. These signals combine to cause muscle cells to grow and repair themselves, both by making new proteins and by turning on special muscle stem cells called “satellite cells,” which reinforce existing muscle.

Thanks to this process, resistance exercise is the most direct way to
increase muscle mass and prevent its loss.

2. Fitness Training
Sustained exercise that raises your heart rate, including aerobic exercise and endurance training, can also control sarcopenia. Most studies of aerobic exercise for the treatment or prevention of sarcopenia have also included resistance and flexibility training as part of a combination exercise program.

3. Walking
Walking can also prevent and even reverse sarcopenia, and it’s an activity most people can do for free, anywhere they live.

SUMMARY:
Exercise is the most effective way to reverse sarcopenia. Resistance (Strength) training is best to increase muscle mass and strength. However, combination exercise programs and walking also fight sarcopenia. At DBM, we suggest staying fit at every age and not allowing sarcopenia to set in. But, it is never too late to get started with your strength training, especially under the guidance of certified personal trainer Debbie Martilotta.

In part by Matthew Thorpe, MD, PhD 


Muscle: The Organ of Longevity, a Broken Brain Podcast

August 22nd, 2018 by Debbie Martilotta

We use our muscles every day, from our brain to our quads, for the smallest and the biggest tasks. Muscles make up an impressive 45% of our body mass. Did you know that muscle is an endocrine organ and regulates metabolism? Did you know that using your muscles can actually help reduce systemic inflammation?

Today on The Broken Brain Podcast, Functional Medicine practitioner Dr. Gabrielle Lyon joins our host, Dhru Purohit, to talk about muscles and optimizing our body composition by eating protein, strength training, and more. Dr. Lyon specializes in muscle-centric medicine and works with her patients to fine-tune metabolism, balance hormones, and transform body composition.

If you want to learn all about protein, and what it can do for your muscles, how it can increase your energy, and increase your longevity, I hope you’ll tune in to our podcast.

In this episode, we dive into:

Muscle: The organ of longevity (2:18)
Obesogenic sarcopenia—what does that mean? (5:08)
Brain and muscle health in the aging (8:13)
Importance of maintaining muscle (10:18)
Everything you need to know about protein (13:21)
Sources of protein (15:58)
Plant-based protein (18:04)
Dr. Lyon’s personal daily diet (20:18)
Aging healthfully (25:26)
Building muscle—where to start? (27:51)
How do I prioritize protein correctly in my daily diet? (32:55)
Dr. Lyon’s favorite protein supplements (36:06)
How can the right protein change my life? (37:43)

I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did.

Wishing you health and happiness,
Mark Hyman, MD


New Studio Location Announced: Bigger and Better!

August 15th, 2018 by Debbie Martilotta

We Are Moving!

DBM Strength Training is moving, our new address is 
6809 Cascade Rd SE, Suite A, GR, MI 49546
Northeast Corner of Cascade Village Centre
(Cascade Rd SE at 28th St. SE), next to Heffron Farms

We are excited to offer;
more space, more windows, and possibly a shower facility.

We will be at the east end of Cascade Village Centre, next door to Heffron Farms and across from Starbucks.

Yes, you read that correctly – Starbucks!

The new studio space will be completed by Monday, August 27th. All classes and sessions from that date on will be in the new building.

 

 

 

CLASS SCHEDULE REMINDER:

Tuesday: 11:45 am-12:15 pm and 6:30 – 7 pm |  Thursday: 11:30 am-12 pm and 6:30 – 7 pm | Saturday: 10:30 am 

We suggest our clients have 1-2 personal training sessions per week by appointment, We also offer group classes at $10 each and find they are a great way to supplement your training sessions.

CLIENT REFERRAL PROGRAM:

For each new client who trains a minimum of 3 months with DBM, the referring client receives a $100 credit on their DBM account. *Be sure to introduce us to your referral prior to their training.