Over Consumption Of Sugar Contributes To Muscle & Joint Pain!

January 8th, 2018 by Debbie Martilotta

This shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone who trains with me! Sugar causes inflammation, and inflammation causes pain and chronic illness!

I like this article from Susan Brady, a Certified Nutritionist, Doctor of Integrative Medicine, Physical Therapist, complete article here; http://bit.ly/2CDJv4J

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the average American consumes roughly 47 pounds of cane sugar and 35 pounds of high-fructose corn syrup per year. 

Research shows that the consumption of foods high in sugar can cause inflammation. Studies measuring inflammation with a blood test called C-reactive protein (CRP) discovered that foods with a high concentration of sugar increase CRP levels.

This occurs because sugary foods cause a spike in a hormone called insulin which starts a cascade of biochemical reactions that lead to the production of inflammation.  Insulin is secreted by the pancreas and is responsible for taking sugar out of the bloodstream and storing it in the cells, which also contributes to the accumulation of fat.  Visceral fat, or stomach fat, itself secretes inflammatory proteins and hormones which generates chronic inflammation.

Most forms of joint pain and muscle aches involve inflammation and, even if the pain is the result of trauma, symptoms may be exacerbated and prolonged by eating foods high in sugar.

LIMITING SUGAR INTAKE IS A MUST FOR REDUCING THE ACCUMULATION OF AGES THAT CAN LEAD TO JOINT DAMAGE AND PAIN.

If you suffer from joint and/or muscle aches and pain, try eliminating sugar from your diet and focus on eating the REAL food provided by nature.  You will be amazed how much better you feel and how much more energy you have, along with improved overall health and fitness!

 

 


Starting January 1, 2018, More Classes Offered!

December 28th, 2017 by Debbie Martilotta

New Class Schedule Starting January 1, 2018

Monday 12-12:30 pm | Tuesday 6:30-7 pm | Thursday 7-7:30 pm
Saturday 10-10:30 am & 11-11:30 am

While I work with each of my individual clients to develop a customized plan consisting of two 30-minute (private or semi-private) sessions per week by appointment, I have always offered group classes. Classes are $10 each and a great way to supplement your sessions with me. 

Whether clients have schedule changes, want an additional workout or new clients want to experience a group setting, I am excited to offer more class times, in my new studio to kick off 2018! Contact me to book your favorite times and get in your best shape NOW.


Give the Gift of Fitness!

December 19th, 2017 by ifi-admin

Image result for gift certificate

Give the gift of fitness with a regular program of two half-hour sessions of high-intensity strength training per week and a clean eating regimen. Call me for delivery at (616) 901-6247.

Save $50 by purchasing 10 sessions, save $150 and purchase 25 sessions or save $350 by giving 50 sessions (6 months of fitness).

My mission is to get you into the best shape of your life.

 


Symptoms Of Vitamin D Deficiency That Most People Ignore

December 18th, 2017 by Debbie Martilotta

Vitamin D deficiency can be responsible for many different symptoms. How many of these do you have? Do you take Vitamin D daily? I recommend 5000 IU’s per day for those living in northern latitudes, especially in the winter when sunlight is diminished. Read this article from HealthWay for more insights, Debbie Martilotta.

Today, more than 40 percent of Americans are deficient. The potential health consequences of this epidemic are serious, as vitamin D deficiency is linked to osteoporosis, heart disease, diabetes, autoimmune diseases, high blood pressure, and poor pregnancy outcomes.

D-ficient? Odds are you don’t know.
According to the Vitamin D Council, symptoms can be subtle—or even nonexistent—in the early stages. You might experience some tiredness and general aches and pains, but these symptoms are easy to dismiss because there are many things that cause them.

Aches and pains? You can easily chalk them up to the aftereffects of your last workout—or simply not being 20 anymore. Tiredness? That could be because you aren’t getting enough quality sleep.

Here are 15 signs that will help you know if you’re vitamin D deficient.

Muscle Weakness
You should be aware that muscle weakness can present as generalized body fatigue. If you’re experiencing a more general fatigue around your body, muscle weakness issues in specific areas may stay hidden and go unnoticed for months.

Bone Pain
In a study of 150 patients referred to a clinic in Minnesota for persistent, general musculoskeletal pain, 93 percent had vitamin D levels equal to or below 20 ng/mL, a level considered deficient by most experts.

Constant Respiratory Problems
Studies show that vitamin D may help defend against respiratory illness, and this is especially true in children. If your child has severe asthma, you may want to increase their vitamin D intake.ll breath may quickly spiral into a panic that your life is in immediate danger.

Sweaty Head
Years ago, doctors used to ask new mothers if their newborns’ heads were sweating more than normal. This can be a very early sign that a baby is vitamin D deficient. If you’re breastfeeding, it may be helpful to consume more foods that are rich in vitamin D or include some vitamin D drops in your regimen to make sure your baby is getting a sufficient amount.

Depression
As it turns out, the sun is vital to keeping a smile on your face. Vitamin D is often referred to as the sunshine vitamin because it is activated in your skin by sunlight. If you live in a place that sees less sunlight than global averages, the lack of light could literally kill your mood. According to the Vitamin D Council, this essential nutrient helps your brain’s neurotransmitters produce serotonin, which affects our feelings of happiness.

Infertility
Research suggests that vitamin D deficiency may play a role in the development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a leading cause of female infertility. One common symptom of PCOS is acanthosis nigricans, which results in dark, velvety skin patches.
“In the fertility world we like to get a baseline on all of our patients and we see many who are deficient,” said Seattle-area registered dietitian nutritionist Judy Simon MS, RDN, CD, CHES, of Mind Body Nutrition.

Chronic Infections
Vitamin D is known to have an effect on over 2,000 genes in the human body, so it’s no surprise that the strength of your body’s immune system is also tied to how much vitamin D you are taking in. When there’s a healthy amount of vitamin D being processed by your body, your immune system is resilient and able to fight off infections and disease.

Cardiovascular Disease
Cardiovascular diseases are heart conditions that may include damaged blood vessels or frequent blood clotting, among other issues. Articles published by the National Institutes of Health have shown that deficiencies in vitamin D can lead to congestive heart failure.

Psoriasis
Psoriasis may present itself as a scaly rash on your scalp or other parts of your body. Often it can be agitated by stress (unfortunately, finding out you have psoriasis tends to cause stress too). Although psoriasis is not always connected to a lack of vitamin D, the vitamin is sometimes used during treatment. The Mayo Clinic claims that if you have a lack of vitamin D, it will be harder for your body to defend itself against psoriasis.

Chronic Pain
If you experience chronic, widespread pain throughout your body, it could be due in part to a lack of vitamin D. This connection was only recently discovered. In 2010, researchers began looking into the link between chronic pain and a lack of vitamin D.

Tiredness
Vitamin D is one of the vitamins your body needs to create energy, and without it, you can end up feeling tired most of the day. This will make it hard for you to get around or even get to work. Without much energy, you may start changing your daily behavior in negative ways, which in turn may impair your overall health.

Hypertension
Harvard University conducted a review of health studies across numerous cohorts that associated increased risk of multiple health outcomes including cardiovascular disease and hypertension (abnormally high blood pressure) with vitamin D deficiency.

Crankiness
As we mentioned in relation to depression, vitamin D affects the levels of serotonin in your brain, which is what affects your mood. If you’re feeling cranky, it might be because you’re not producing enough serotonin. Vitamin D will help your moods stay balanced by ensuring your brain is working with the materials it needs to stay energized and focused.

Chronic Kidney Disease
Kidneys help remove waste from your blood. When they’re not functioning correctly, your bloodstream can fill up with waste, seriously damaging your health. Doctors have recently connected kidney health to cardiovascular disease. They’ve also discovered how important vitamin D can be to your kidneys’ health.

Reduced Endurance
If you’re an athlete and you’re seeing your endurance decrease for no apparent reason, it might be because you have low vitamin D levels. Experts in athletic circles now realize that vitamin D is crucial to energy levels, especially when it comes to endurance. Even active people who get outside every day can experience these issues, despite getting more than the recommended amount of sunlight per day (20 to 30 minutes).

A Side Effect of Modern Life?

For many of us, work means days spent at a desk and leisure means binge-watching the latest Netflix series or catching up on social media. That’s a lot of indoor time, but even when we are outdoors we’re likely to double down on sun protection to prevent premature aging and skin cancer.

Dairy products are fortified with vitamin D, but milk sales are in decline, as more people avoid dairy due to restrictive diets, milk allergies, or lactose intolerance.

What’s your risk?
Although 4 in 10 Americans may be deficient in vitamin D, some people have a higher risk. As mentioned, if you spend a lot of time indoors and protect your skin with clothing or sunscreen when you are outdoors (as you should), your risk increases. Living in northern climates—where winters are longer, colder and darker—amplifies this risk. But a few other risk factors might surprise you:

  • Dark skin. The darker your skin, the more sun it takes to make vitamin D.
  • Body mass index (BMI) over 30. Vitamin D can become “sequestered” in excess body fat instead of making its way to the bloodstream.
  • Past gastric bypass surgery.

Why It Matters
Linke says that bringing vitamin D levels back to the normal range has been a “game changer” for many of her clients who have autoimmune conditions. She cites another client—a woman in her late twenties—whose vitamin D was a 4.

Within 10 days of starting vitamin D, along with magnesium (magnesium deficiency can interfere with vitamin D metabolism) and dietary changes, she was able to wear regular shoes and walk without assistance.

As with all health-related issues, talk with your doctor or another medical professional if you are seeing any signs or symptoms that concern you. Deficiency is simple to test for and simple to treat. If in doubt, talk to your healthcare provider.

Read the complete article here http://bit.ly/2lP2SE7.


Doctors Reveal Which Everyday Habits Trigger Aging And Inflammation

December 12th, 2017 by Debbie Martilotta

The visible effects of aging are different for everyone, which is super unfair if you ask us.

“Aging affects us on a genetic level.”

This article is from our friends at HealthyWay

But rather than lament early crow’s feet or thinning hair, we decided to ask doctors what aging really is—what causes declining health over time—in the hopes of learning how we can slow down the unpleasant bits of growing older while enjoying the wisdom and greater clarity that often show up at the same time as your first gray hairs.

What we found out suggests that our lifestyles need to seriously change if we plan to keep a youthful look well into our golden years.

1. Your Contemporary Job

The sedentary lifestyle is literally killing us. Studies suggest that women who spend at least six hours a day in a chair are 34 percent more likely to die early, and their cancer risk increases by 10 percent. The risk of early death for similarly sedentary men is 17 percent.

“One study even indicated that standing up every 30 minutes throughout the day can have similar health benefits as quitting smoking.”

Either way, the picture is bleak. And the problem goes deeper than a simple lack of exercise, says Heather Hamilton, MD, a family medicine physician at Memorial Hermann Convenient Care Center in Houston.

“This is not just about getting regular exercise, but also pertains to prolonged periods of sitting,” Hamilton tells HealthyWay. “Recent studies show that sitting too long can lead to higher mortality and early death.

Maybe you’ve heard that “sitting is the new smoking.” That’s pretty much what this study says, just with a lot more data and hard-to-read scientific lingo. There’s no shortage of studies showing how important it is to get off of our heinies every once in a while.

But it’s not that simple. So many of our jobs require us to sit at computers for eight hours a day. What can we do to mitigate the damage our careers are doing to our bodies?

Reporting by the Washington Post that included interviews with doctors, researchers, and biomechanists offer a few solutions. Sit on an exercise ball at work, they say. When you’re watching TV, get up and walk around every time there’s a commercial.

“This is applicable to many people with sedentary jobs,” Hamilton says. “People can simply stand and move at [their] workstation, walk down the hall, or take a bathroom break.” These are small things, but they add up over a lifetime—which may be considerably longer if you follow these suggestions.

2. Skipping the Cheese

You’ve probably heard that the “sunshine vitamin” helps our bodies build calcium into bone. In fact, vitamin D is crucial for preventing inflammation-related disorders that come with age.

Registered dietitian Maryann Tomovich Jacobsen reviewed and approved a list of the risks of a vitamin D deficiency that was published on WebMD, and they’re pretty scary.

The hazards of low levels of this crucial nutrient include aging-related dementia, cancer, and an increased risk of fatal cardiovascular disease. Ideal vitamin D levels differ from patient to patient, so ask your doctor if you’re getting enough through diet and time in the sun.

“Physicians recommend getting at least 10 minutes of sunlight (with sunscreen) every day and a balanced diet rich in vitamin D,” Hamilton says. “Some people may need to take…vitamin D supplements.”

There’s some good news for people who need to get more vitamin D into their diets, at least. Cheese is packed with the stuff. Not as much as cod liver oil, maybe, but which would you rather eat?

3. Laser-Focusing on Cardio

It’s hard enough to get to the gym in the first place. Once you’re there, it can be tempting to zone out on the bikes or the treadmill. Although cardio is great, there are real risks related to a lack of strength training.

“The aging process is associated with changes in muscle mass and strength with the decline of muscle strength after the 30th year,” write Karsten Keller and Martin Engelhardt in the journal Muscles, Ligaments, and Tendons.

While your muscles are wasting away, your metabolism slows down. This combination of factors can lead to unhealthy weight gain, which carries its own list of horrors. The point is, arm day may be more important than you think. Don’t neglect the weights.

4. Trying to Wring Even More Hours Out of the Day

We have a very sad fact to share. Brace yourself: Coffee cannot replace sleep. We know, we know. We’re grieving too.

The truth is that doctors are serious when they tell you to get between seven and nine hours of sleep a night, every night, at least between the ages of 18 and 64. Less than that could affect your productivity and, worse, encourage your arteries to harden. The importance of sleep cannot be stressed enough.

An article in the Harvard Business Review written by Harvard Medical School professor Charles Czeisler warns us that people who sleep less than five hours a night for five years in a row are three times more likely to develop hardened arteries.

“The importance of sleep cannot be stressed enough,” says Hamilton. “Sleep allows your body to process nutrients
taken in during the day and allows your mind to process events of the day.”
There isn’t really a problem that insufficient sleep doesn’t make worse. “Memory loss and mood disorders such as anxiety and depression have also been linked to sleep deprivation,” Hamilton says.

Even worse, skimping on your Zs can wreak havoc on your genes themselves, leading to DNA damage that raises your risk of cancer. We don’t know how to get more hours in the week either, but it’s clear that skipping sleep is not the way to do it.

5. Hating Your Job

If you want to live a long, happy life, free from the damaging effects of growing inflammation, you need to follow your passion. That’s not just a feel-good platitude; it’s medical science.

A systematic literature review published in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine found that “job satisfaction level is an important factor influencing the health of workers.”

Hating your job can even spark or exacerbate mental health issues, explains Hamilton.

“Mood disorders such as depression or anxiety can be linked to job dissatisfaction,” she says. “There is an intricate interplay between health and job satisfaction in which both affect each other. When dealing with mental health, it is important to assess outlook on work as well as work-life balance.”

This all makes perfect sense when you think about it. When you hate your job, you spend every day stressed out and angry. According to the American Psychological Association, chronic stress makes existing health problems worse. It encourages the formation of bad habits, such as smoking and overeating. It can even increase your risk of cardiovascular disease.

According to the latest report from the Pew Research Center, a discouraging 15 percent of working adults say they are “somewhat” or “very dissatisfied” with their jobs. But it’s important to remember that many of us do have other options. No matter how restricted you may feel, there’s always another job (or career!) out there, and remaining stuck in an unpleasant environment can actually speed up the aging process.

Tying It All Together

Okay, so what have we learned? Sleep enough, get off your behind, find a job you like, and work out. But no one of these things alone is enough to stop the hands of the clock entirely.

To hold off the visible signs of aging as long as possible, you need to adopt a holistic approach to health, says Ellie Cobb, PhD, a psychologist who focuses on the mind-body connection in wellness.

Aging affects us on a genetic level, Cobb tells HealthyWay, citing research by Elizabeth Blackburn and Elissa Epel that suggests the telomeres at the ends of our chromosomes actually shorten as we age. And these shorter telomeres that cause the negative health effects of aging. That’s because when these DNA caps reach a certain reduced length, the cells that contain them stop replicating. They die.

“The positive news is that scientific research also shows that we can change our telomere length by what situations we experience in life and how we chose to react to those experiences,” Cobb tells us.

So, like, how?

“Some positive ways to reduce inflammation (and therefore reduce negative aging effects) are [to] aim to get regular sufficient sleep, adopt a consistent meditation practice, be conscious of eating healthy fats and vegetables like avocados and leafy greens instead of refined sugars, exercise moderately, and find joy and thankfulness in the little things in life,” Cobb says.

So that’s it! Mindfulness is like calisthenics for your telomeres. We’ll see you and your lanky telomeres on the dance floor in many, many decades.


New Studio Open House, Wednesday, Dec 13th, 5:30-8:30 pm 

December 5th, 2017 by ifi-admin

Please help us celebrate DBM’s new location!
New Studio Open House, Wednesday, Dec 13, 5:30-8:30 pm 
4797 Cascade Rd SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546 | (616) 901-6247

Join us for a great lineup of speakers and a chance to win a grand prize package of 10 strength training sessions for members who bring a guest.

Lineup:

5:30 pm Ribbon Cutting by the Forest Hills Business Association

Catering by Bliss & Vinegar

6:15 p.m. Mary Heim, RPh, FAAFM, founder of Rivertown Compounding Pharmacy will speak on How Exercise Affects your Hormones 

6:45 p.m. Dr Matthew Phinney, of The Chiropractic Doctors will speak on Structural Strength & Maximizing Performance and Productivity

7:15 p.m. Jonathan Wenger of Lettuce Boy Farm will speak at on Know your Food, Know your Farmer.  

Let us know you’re attending at our Facebook Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/528525434192661/


DBM Strength Training Announces New Grand Rapids – Forest Hills Location!

November 15th, 2017 by ifi-admin

DBM-Social-GoogleDebbie Martilotta of DBM Strength Training is delighted to announce the opening of her new Grand Rapids strength training studio. As of December 1, 2017, all personal training sessions and classes will be held at 4797 Cascade Rd SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546.

For Debbie, the new location is a dream come true.
“Being a trainer is truly an honor for me. Working with my clients to help them reach their fitness goals has inspired me to reach one of my own goals,” she said.

Benefits of the new location include more flexible training times and additional classes.

Debbie credits her “awesome clients” for the gym’s growth.

New Referral Program

The move has also opened up the capability to accept new clients who are looking for a personal trainer who produces results. For each new client referred who trains a minimum of 3 months with DBM, the referrer receives a $100 credit on their DBM account.
“I believe in my fitness family and feel strongly that we can grow as a family, supporting each other in fitness and in health,” Debbie said.

Directions

The new location shares the building with Mast Heating and Cooling. The studio entrance is on the west end of the building, facing Cascade Road.


Grand Rapids Personal Training: Low Fat Diet Risks

August 11th, 2016 by Debbie Martilotta

Low Fat Diet illustrationIn a recent article, Dr. Axe discusses the risks of a low-fat diet. At DBM Strength Training, we counsel our clients on great nutrition habits as well as effective workout routines for fast, efficient results! Contact us for a nutritional assessment!

From Dr. Axe’s article: 7 Low-Fat Diet Tips You Need To Know

Fats are an essential nutrient and one of the primary energy sources for the body. They also play a big role in weight management, absorbing nutrients, maintaining healthy skin and hair, regulating body temperature, supporting immune function, insulating internal organs, and hormonal balance. You can see right off the bat why there are just so many low-fat diet risks to be aware of!

While a balanced diet that includes plenty of plant foods, like vegetables and some fruit, is key for long-term health, fats are actually needed to properly absorb the fat-soluble vitamins found in many plants — including vitamin A, D, E and K. Fats also make us feel satisfied after eating — which is not just a nice perk that should be overlooked.

Most healthy sources of fat are also ultimate fat-burning foods. Their ability to make our food taste good, turn off hunger and stop overeating has a lot to do with weight management.

Why We Need Fats: The Low-Fat Diet Risks That May Surprise You

Fats in general have gotten a bad rap in our heart-healthy and fat-obsessed diet culture. For decades, we’ve been told to put fatty foods like coconuts, eggs, fatty cuts of meat and full-fat dairy in the “foods to avoid” category. Since the government’s 1980 Dietary Guidelines were established over 30 years ago, dietary policy has focused on reducing total fat in the American diet to no more than 30 percent of a person’s daily calories. And many of the most popular “diet plans” over the years have reduced fat to much lower levels than this.

Although we hear much more about healthy fats in the mainstream media today, anything high-fat still sets off alarm bells for most of us and raises concerns about packing on the pounds. Low-fat, diet and light products of all sorts continue to pack grocery store shelves — but what are the real risks of consuming these foods over the full-fat varieties?

Not all fats are created equally and not all affect the body in the same way. While processed and refined fats found in boxed foods and most restaurant fare can be harmful, other types of natural fats have beneficial, life-extending properties. When we miss out on fats in our diets, we can quickly find ourselves feeling tired, moody, constantly hungry, unable to kick cravings and resentful over our restrictive diets.

Read the rest of this story at: https://draxe.com/low-fat-diet-risks/


Grand Rapids Trainer News: Can You Out-Train Your Diet?

November 2nd, 2015 by Debbie Martilotta

donutkickerGrand Rapids Strength Trainer Debbie Martilotta Explains Why Nutrition Has to Be Part of Your Plan

People often come to me saying they need to “work out more” to lose weight. And many of them shed plenty of pounds in two short half-hour weekly sessions with me. However, he truth is that you CANNOT out-train your diet, no matter how hard you work. You simply cannot burn enough calories to eat like King Henry. I know this from personal experience, and the science behind strength training! Strength training DOES elevate your metabolism, and replacing fat with lean muscle developed through a rigorous strength training program will certainly make you LOOK, and feel,  slimmer. But a good personal trainer will not leave nutrition out of the equation. I coach my clients to remember that “real food” doesn’t have an ingredient label!

Sometimes, even when your caloric intake isn’t the problem, there are other things that interfere with weight management. I help clients determine what’s beating them in the battle of the bulge. Here are a few things to consider:

Allergies – Are you having a difficult time shedding pounds? You may have some food allergies. To find out you can start by removing wheat, grain, and dairy (these are the biggest culprits) from your diet for two to three weeks. Also eliminate corn, soy and consider nixing additives such as food coloring and preservatives.

Bad Breakfast – Another habit that sets you up for failure is eating too many carbs at breakfast, which leads to spikes in insulin levels and sets you up for cravings later in the day. It’s best to have protein and healthy fats in the morning. An omelet (with the yolk), or a smoothie blended with healthy fats such as avocado, almond butter, coconut oil, or MCT oil would be a much better option than cereal or a muffin, even the healthy, whole wheat kinds.

Trans fats have been shown to raise bad cholesterol (LDL) and lower good cholesterol (HDL), factors that contribute to the risk of developing heart disease, stroke and Type 2 diabetes. Your best bet for avoiding partially hydrogenated oils:

  • Shop the periphery of the store. Stick to whole food items in the produce, meat and dairy departments. Bring home foods that are as close to their original state as possible.
  • Read the label and the ingredient list. Check for the grams of trans fats per serving, avoid anything over 0 grams (if it is within your power to do so) and even if the grams says “0,” ensure that the ingredients does not list any “partially hydrogenated” oils.
  • Cook your own foods from scratch. The best way to avoid trans fats is to prepare foods the old-fashioned way with natural ingredients like how your grandparents would have done. This is the only way to really control what goes into your body.
  • Select products with the fewest ingredients. More is not necessarily better.
  • Avoid processed foods that come in a box, bag, or can.
  • If it contains ingredients that you can’t pronounce, it’s probably to be avoided.

Looking for a personal strength trainer in the Grand Rapids area to help you navigate nutrition and get you working out in two half-hour sessions a week? Contact me to get started!


Grand Rapids Trainer News: Weight Training May Improve Brain Health

October 22nd, 2015 by Debbie Martilotta

cognitiveCan strength training with Grand Rapids Personal Trainer Debbie Martilotta twice a week actually fight the loss of memory and cognition attributed to “gaps” in the aging brain? According to an article published on the New York Times website, the answer could very well be yes.

By the time many of us reach late middle age, our brains have started developing small lesions or gaps within the white matter, which many studies claim to be the cause of lapses in recall or cognition. White matter fills the space between other areas of the brain, and is responsible for communication between these centers. These lesions only get bigger over time, but there are steps you can take to slow them down and keep the white matter intact. One of which is getting regular exercise. Usually when people hear this, they think of aerobic exercises, not necessarily strength training.

In a study performed by Dr. Teresa Liu-Ambrose, it was discovered that strength training may also contribute to slowing down the growth of these gaps. Read the rest of this entry »