Inside Outside Egg Rolls

May 27th, 2020 by Debbie Martilotta
Ingredients:
  • 1 cup cabbage or tri-color coleslaw mix, shredded
  • 1/4 cup celery, chopped
  • 1/4 cup scallions, chopped
  • 6.5 oz lean grass-fed ground beef – you will need 4.3 oz cooked
  • 2 farm-fresh eggs, whisked
  • 1/8 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/8 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/8 tsp Chinese five-spice blend
  • 1 tbsp lite soy sauce or Braggs amino
Directions:
  1. Combine shredded cabbage, celery, and scallions. Toss together. Set aside.
  2. Brown ground beef. Throw the veggies in with the meat.
  3. Sprinkle stir-fry mixture with ginger, garlic, and five-spice blend.
  4. Add soy sauce and whisked eggs into the skillet.
  5. Continue to stir-fry until vegetables are tender, but firm. (No pieces of egg should be visible.)
  6. Remove skillet from heat and serve.

from Sandy’s Kitchen Adventures


Cauliflower Grits with Spicy Shrimp

May 11th, 2020 by Debbie Martilotta

Ingredients

Cauliflower Grits

  • 1 cup unsweetened cashew milkor coconut milk or grass-fed whole dairy milk
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted grass-fed butteror ghee
  • ¼ cup unsalted chicken stockor vegetable stock
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ cup grated organic sharp cheddar cheese

Shrimp

  • 1 pound shrimppeeled and deveined, 16/20 count
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher saltdivided
  •  teaspoon black pepper
  •  teaspoon cayenne pepper
  •  teaspoon paprika
  • 4 slices nitrate free baconthick-cut, chopped into ½-inch pieces
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlicabout 4 cloves
  • ¼ cup yellow oniondiced into ¼-inch cubes
  • ¼ cup red bell pepperdiced into ¼-inch cubes
  • 2 tablespoons olive oilto substitute bacon grease if desired
  • 4 teaspoons lemon juice
  • ¼ cup green onionsthinly sliced

Greens

  • 8 ounces swiss chardsliced into 1-inch strips

Instructions

Cauliflower Grits

  1. Grate or add cauliflower florets to a food processor. You want the cauliflower to be about the size of rice grains. See the video linked here.
  2. Add cauliflower to a medium-sized saute pan and cook over medium-high heat for about 5 minutes, constantly stirring to release some moisture from the vegetable.
  3. Add one tablespoon of butter, ¼ cup of cashew milk, ¼ cup of chicken stock, and ¼ teaspoon salt. Stir and cook until moisture gets absorbed and cauliflower cooks through about 5 minutes.
  4. sing an immersion hand blender or blender, pulse cauliflower mixture until it resembles the texture of grits (smooth yet still grainy). You don’t want the mixture to be completely smooth.
  5. Transfer back to the pan. Turn heat to medium and add in ¼ cup grated cheese, stir until melted. Slowly add about ½ to ¾ cup more cashew milk until the grits are smooth and creamy. Taste and season with more salt and pepper as desired. Keep warm over very low heat while making the shrimp.

Spicy Shrimp

  1. In a medium-sized bowl combine shrimp, ¼ teaspoon salt, ⅛ teaspoon pepper, ⅛ teaspoon cayenne pepper, and ⅛ teaspoon paprika. Set aside. You can add more cayenne pepper if you like it really spicy.
  2. Heat a large saute pan over medium-high heat. Add diced bacon and cook until crispy, frequently stirring about 6 minutes. Transfer to a paper towel and drain. Keep 2 tablespoons of bacon grease in the pan, or you can remove and use 2 tablespoons of olive oil instead.
  3. Heat pan to medium and add garlic and onion, stir and cook for 1 minute until fragrant. Add in the bell peppers and cook 1 minute.
  4. Turn heat to medium-high and add shrimp. Cook for 2 minutes on one side, and 1 minute on the other until pink. Add in 4 teaspoons of lemon juice, 2 tablespoons green onions and cooked bacon. Stir to combine, cook about 1 minute. Transfer shrimp to a warm bowl.

Greens

  1. In the same pan add the swiss chard. Cook on medium-high heat until wilted and tender, about 3 to 4 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

To Serve: Stir and reheat grits if needed. Divide grits, greens, and shrimp evenly among serving bowls.

by Jessica Gavin


How Much Protein Should I Eat Daily For Weight Loss?

February 5th, 2020 by Debbie Martilotta

Decades of scientific research on weight loss have uncovered a few key pieces of information on what helps people successfully win the battle of the bulge.

  • First, we know that while exercise is important, a person’s healthy eating habits likely matters more for weight loss than the hours they spend in the gym.
  • Second, when it comes to dieting, there is no single best one for losing weight; many diets can work quite well as long as total calorie balance is accounted for.
  • Third, dietary protein is one of the key “levers” in a diet that increases the likelihood of someone’s ability to lose weight.

This article is going to cut through a lot of the noise surrounding protein and tell you how much protein you should be eating to lose weight and some of the things you should consider when planning your diet.

WHAT IS PROTEIN?
Protein is an important macronutrient that is involved in nearly all bodily functions and processes. It plays a key role in exercise recovery and is an essential dietary nutrient for healthy living. Protein and amino acids are primarily used to create bodily tissues, form enzymes, and cellular transporters, maintain fluid balance, and more.

HOW MUCH PROTEIN PER DAY TO LOSE WEIGHT?
If you want to lose weight, aim for a daily protein intake between .73 and 1 grams per pound. Athletes and heavy exercisers should consume 1-1.5 grams per pound if aiming for weight loss.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF PROTEIN IN WEIGHT LOSS?
Dietary protein can be an important part of a diet that is intended for weight loss. While there are many benefits to dietary protein, there are four main areas that have direct effects on weight loss:

  • Satiety
  • Lean mass
  • Thermic effect of food
  • Storage as body fat

Let us take a deeper dive into each of these topics.

PROTEIN HELPS YOU FEEL FULL LONGER
One of the biggest things that impede weight loss is hunger.

People are far less likely to stick with a nutrition or diet plan if they experience high levels of hunger.

Protein is the most satiating of all the macronutrients.

Several different lines of research have all pointed to the same thing: higher protein intakes tend to provide more satiety and less hunger.

For example, in one study, high protein snacks allowed people to go longer between eating and also caused them to eat less at subsequent meals.

Another study showed that including protein into a glass of water decreased hunger compared to water alone.

Depending on the source of protein, there does appear to be minor differences in the exact amount of satiety that protein provides, however these differences are minor and don’t really make a meaningful impact for most people.

Currently, there is no consensus on the optimal level of daily protein intake in one’s diet with regard to staying full. However, roughly .82-1.32 grams of protein per pound appear to provide substantial benefit on satiety.

PROTEIN PRESERVES LEAN BODY MASS
In addition, protein has another benefit on weight loss: it helps preserve lean body mass during periods of caloric restriction.

One study compared the effect of low protein intake (1.0 grams per kilogram per day) to high protein intake (2.3 g/kg per day) on lean body mass over a short term caloric deficit. On average, the low protein group lost about 1.6 kilograms (3.5 pounds) of muscle mass while the high protein group only lost 0.3 kg (0.66 pounds) of muscle mass.

Currently, most evidence suggests that .73 grams of protein per pound are a recommended daily target for protein intake to spare lean body mass loss during periods of weight loss.

PROTEIN INCREASES THE THERMIC EFFECT OF FOOD
The thermic effect of food is the “cost” of digesting your food.

Essentially, it takes some energy to break food down, digest it, and turn it into energy. Protein has the highest “cost” of all three macronutrients.

While the total effect that the thermic effect of food has on daily energy expenditure and weight loss is small, it is not meaningless and is important to note.

In one study, a high protein diet increased the thermic effect of food by roughly 6-8 kcals per hour when compared to a low protein diet, which may translate to ~50-75 calories per day.

However, not all studies show this large of an effect, and the thermic effect of protein is not likely responsible for most of its benefit, but it may be the “cherry on top” of adequate dietary protein during weight loss.

PROTEIN IS HARD TO STORE AS BODY FAT
During periods of weight loss, there are often times where more energy is consumed than expended. As such, minimizing how much of that excess energy (i.e. calories) is stored as fat is important.

The body processes the three different macronutrients (i.e. proteins, carbohydrates, and fats) in very different ways.

Leaving out a lot of jargon and mumbo jumbo, in order for protein to be stored as fat, it goes through a much different biochemical process than either carbohydrates or fats.

This process makes it much harder for protein to store as body fat.

One study found that protein is stored as body fat with roughly 66% efficiency, while carbohydrates store with 80% efficiency and fats store at 96% efficiency.

During weight loss, overeating protein results in much less stored body fat than overeating on carbohydrates or fat.

While many different diets can be successful for weight loss, the protein content of a diet is one of the important factors to consider when planning a diet. Protein has been shown to promote satiety, help maintain lean body mass, increase the thermic effect of food slightly, and can reduce how efficient the body is at storing extra calories as body fat.

Courtesy of NASM.org


The Surprising Benefits of Weight Training

February 5th, 2020 by Debbie Martilotta

The most common misconception about weight training is that it adds bulky muscle mass, a fear of some women. While elite male lifters can — and want to — get very developed, for most people the result is simply well-toned muscles.

Other benefits are increased mobility, more support for your joints and the ability to stay self-sufficient in your later years.

As an added bonus, having more muscle can also help you with your weight goal. That’s because the more muscle you have, the higher your metabolic rate and the more calories you burn. Add a calorie cut into the mix and you’ll lose weight.

Muscle is denser than fat and it also takes up less room. That’s why you can look leaner yet actually weigh more than someone without muscle definition.

To make the most of strength training, lift heavier weights than you think you’re able to. Yes, challenge yourself, staying within safe limits. You don’t want to try to lift a weight you can barely pick up off the weight rack, but most people underestimate the amount they can handle or fail to progress to heavier weights, according to the American Council on Exercise, and that limits the effectiveness of strength training.

Keep in mind, too, that you don’t have to spend hours in the gym. All you need are 20 to 30 minutes every other day to accomplish training goals. Do one to three short sets — eight reps per set — with high weights and a mix of exercises that target all the major muscle groups.

If you’re new to strength training, get your doctor’s OK first and work with a trainer on proper form.

Our recommendation is 2 30 -minute sessions or group class + session each week, along with a clean diet, and you’ll be amazed at how good you feel, and look!

By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter, U.S. News


Cast Iron Whole Chicken

January 27th, 2020 by Debbie Martilotta

A simple and easy whole roasted chicken that is full of flavor, perfectly moist, and tender! This recipe is gluten-free, allergy-free, and paleo using a no-fail method for success. We think it’s just a fabulous way to up your protein and enjoy a home-cooked meal.

Ingredients:
•1 whole free-range, organic chicken, 4-5 lbs
•2 small Gala apples, chopped
•1 large shallot, chopped
•2 t oil (I use sunflower oil)
•1 1/2 t dried thyme
•1 t dried basil
•1/2 t garlic powder
•1/2 t onion powder
•1/2 t ground ginger
•1/4 t ground black pepper

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 375oF
2. Rinse and pat dry the chicken, inside and outside
3. Place chicken in a large seasoned cast iron skillet and stuff with chopped apples and shallot in the cavity of the chicken, place any extra pieces around the chicken in the cast iron skillet
4. Rub the outside with the oil, herbs, and spices
5. Roast in the oven for about 1 hour and 40minutes (about 20 minutes per pound) or until the chicken reaches a safe 180F
6. Remove from oven, cover with foil, let rest for 15-20 minutes before carving

Recipe from Strength & Sunshine


Roasted Zucchini, Squash, Onions, and Tomatoes

August 14th, 2019 by Debbie Martilotta

Ingredients

  • 2 small zucchini (1 lb), cut into 1/2-inch thick slices
  • 2 small yellow squash (1 lb), cut into 1/2-inch thick slices
  • 1 med onion, cut into 1″ thick squares
  • 14 oz cherry or small Campari tomatoes, sliced in halve
  • 3 Tbsp olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced (1 1/2 Tbsp)
  • 1 1/4 tsp Italian seasoning (or your favorite dried or fresh herbs)
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup finely shredded organic Parmesan cheese
  • Fresh or dried parsley, for garnish (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Line an 18 by 13 inch rimmed baking sheet with a sheet of parchment paper or aluminum foil.
  3. In a small bowl whisk together olive oil, garlic and Italian seasoning (if possible let rest 5 – 10 minutes to allow flavors to infuse into oil).
  4. Place zucchini, squash, onions, and tomatoes in a large mixing bowl. Pour olive oil mixture over top and gently toss with hands to evenly coat.
  5. Pour onto the prepared baking dish and spread into an even layer. Season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle Parmesan over the top of each.
  6. Roast in preheated oven 25 – 30 minutes until veggies are tender and Parmesan is golden brown.
  7. Garnish with parsley if desired and serve warm.

Recipe source: Cooking Classy


Egg And Ham Cups

February 12th, 2019 by Debbie Martilotta

Ingredients
1 slice low-fat, nitrate free, deli ham
1 whole, farm fresh egg
2 tbsp organic, reduced fat cheddar cheese, shredded
1 slice, thin/small tomatoes, sliced

Directions
1. Preheat the oven to 375°F
2. Spray the cups of a muffin tin with nonstick cooking spray.
3. Press the sliced ham into the muffin tin cup, forming a ham cup.
4. Place the tomato slice in the cup.
5. Crack the egg and drop it in on top of the tomato. Repeat this process for as many cups as desired.
6. Place the muffin tin in the oven and bake for 10-15 minutes, or until the egg is almost cooked.
7. Top with cheese and bake for an additional 3-5 minutes, or until the cheese is melted.

Let cool for a few minutes. Once the cup has cooled, use a spatula to carefully transfer it to a plate.
Eat with your choice of carbs, such as a piece of fruit or low carb oats.

Courtesy of Jim Stoppani, Ph.D.

 


4 Easy Ways To Boost Your Bland Fitness Food

February 5th, 2019 by Debbie Martilotta

Clients who are staying fit and healthy may use meal prepping as a way to be more conscientious about their diet. Keeping your meals simple and repetitive can make meal planning easier to stick to. However, eating the same thing over and over again can get old fast. (Chicken and broccoli, anyone?)

Spices are an easy way to change the taste of your food, without adding many calories or messing up your macros. Most spices and herbs add zero fat or protein to your meal, and only add a gram or two of carbs, even if you use an excessive amount. For example, garlic powder has approximately 2 grams of carbs per teaspoon, which is generally way more than you would use in a single serving. Beware of store-bought spice mixes such as a generic “steak seasoning,” though, as many of these have fillers and an excess of salt added to them.

Spices are especially good on proteins, such as eggs, pork, tofu, or chicken. Most spices are great on their own and are a simple way to make your bland meal more flavorful. To take it a step further, combining spices can create nearly endless flavor possibilities. With a few easy spice combos, you can make a simple chicken breast taste like your favorite world cuisine.

The amounts of each spice you use will vary depending on the type of food you’re putting it on and personal taste. A good place to start is one part garlic, chipotle, etc., to two parts basil, oregano, etc. Then, adjust a little bit at a time until you figure out what you like. If you aren’t watching your salt intake, adding a little bit of salt can help bring out the flavor of these spice combos.

Here are a few simplified flavor profiles to get you started:

  • To give your food a Mexican flair, create a dry rub with cumin, garlic powder, chipotle, and cilantro. This works especially well on meat, but it could also be mixed into rice or sprinkled on eggs.
  • For more of an Italian taste, combine garlic powder, onion powder, basil, and oregano. This combo can be used as a dry rub for meats, sprinkled on fried or scrambled eggs, or even mixed into tomato sauce to create your own pasta sauce.
  • For a Thai curry flavor, combine basil, garlic powder, curry powder, ginger, and cumin. This mix can be used to season meats or rice, or combined with canned coconut milk to create a simplified curry sauce.
  • For a barbecue taste without the sauce, try combining smoked paprika, cumin, cinnamon, black pepper, garlic powder, and onion powder. Use as a dry rub for meat, sprinkle it on eggs, or experiment by putting it on other foods to see what you like.

Check out our recipes here.

by Freida Johnson


Easy Dijon Chicken or Salmon

January 21st, 2019 by Debbie Martilotta

Ingredients:

  • 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil for chicken, 1 tablespoon for salmon
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon or spicy brown mustard
  • ½ to 1 teaspoon dried thyme, rosemary, tarragon, or other herbs of your choice
  • 2 pounds bone-in, skin-on, free-range chicken thighs or 1 ½ pounds skin-on, wild-caught salmon fillets

Directions:

Step 1: Preheat the oven to 350°F.

Step 2: Combine the olive oil, salt, pepper, mustard, and herbs in a small bowl.

Step 3: Rub the mustard mixture over the chicken and under the chicken skin or on both sides of the salmon until completely covered. Cook immediately, or for a more flavorful dish, cover and set aside in the refrigerator to marinate for at least 1 hour; salmon should marinate for no longer than 3 hours.

Step 4: Place the chicken or salmon skin-side up in a 9-inch square baking dish or medium baking sheet. Bake the chicken for 45 minutes or the salmon for 15 minutes, or until cooked through. For chicken, if there are juices in the pan, use them to occasionally baste while cooking by spooning the juice in the baking dish over the chicken.

Step 5: If desired, broil for 1 to 2 minutes at the end of the cooking time for crispier skin.

Nutritional analysis per serving (chicken):
Calories 307 • fat 21g • carbohydrate 0g • sugar 0g • protein 29g

Nutritional analysis per serving (salmon):
Calories 272 • fat 14g • carbohydrate 0g • sugar 0g • protein 34g

David Ludwig, Always Delicious


Slow Roasted Salmon Bowls

January 21st, 2019 by Debbie Martilotta

Slow-Roasted Salmon:

  • 1/2 lb. thick wild Salmon Fillet
  • Mixed herbs (like chives, rosemary, and thyme)
  • Lemon zest
  • A drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil
  • Sea salt

Herb Sauce:

  • 1 cup packed basil
  • 1/4 cup packed chives
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Brussels Sprouts Slaw:

  • Handful Brussels sprouts
  • Lemon juice
  • A drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Extra ingredients:

  • 1 avocado, sliced
  • Two handfuls baby lettuces
  • Optional: tri-color quinoa (skip the potatoes)

For the Salmon:
Step 1: Preheat the oven to 250°F.
Step 2: Place the salmon skin side down on a parchment lined baking sheet.
Step 3: Sprinkle with kosher salt and scatter some fresh herbs over the top – use whatever you have on hand but some favorites are thyme, rosemary, and chives. Add some lemon zest and a drizzle of olive oil.
Step 4: Roast in the oven for 25 to 30 minutes, until you can easily pierce through and flake with a fork.

For the Brussels Sprouts:
Step 1: Toss the shredded sprouts with a few generous squeezes of lemon, a drizzle of olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix well and set aside.

For the herb sauce:
Step 1: Combine the basil, chives, and lemon juice in a blender.
Step 2: With machine running, slowly blend in olive oil, adding more as needed until sauce blends smooth. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

To assemble:
Step 1: Gently flake salmon and divide into two portions.
Step 2: Assemble two bowls, each with half of the salmon, Brussel sprouts, baby lettuces, and avocado. Optional: You may also add tri-color quinoa.
Step 3: Top each bowl with the herb sauce.

Nutritional analysis per serving (makes 2 servings):
Calories 565, fat 47g, protein 26g, carbohydrate 14g, sodium 649mg